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Title: Opinion of the experts group on trafficking in human beings of the European Commission in connection with the Conference
“Tackling human trafficking: policy and best practices in Europe” and its related documents
Author (Corp. Body): Experts group on trafficking in human beings of the European Commission
Publisher: Europäische Kommission / Generaldirektion Justiz und Inneres
Year: 2005
Language: en
Ressource: Einzelne Berichte, Studien
Keyword: European Lawslave tradeadministrative procedure
Subject: European Community external relations and associated countriesEuropean Community law in general
Countries Scheme: Europe. General Resources
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Title: Mid-term Meta Evaluation of IPA Assistance Evaluation Report : Final version
Abstract
This evaluation covers mainly Component I for which the EC has undertaken interim evaluations covering programming and implementation of IPA assistance as part of the specific regulatory requirement for evaluation and programming needs under this Component.For Components II to V, interim evaluations covering implementation of IPA assistance have not been completed by the time this meta-evaluation was undertaken. For Component II, the metaevaluation has used a recent evaluation on Governance Structures and procedures. For Components III, IV and V the meta-evaluation has used ex-ante evaluations. This has limited the analysis of these three components in the current report to the area of the intervention logic of programming.[Author vide copyright]
Table of Contents
Glossary of Acronyms
Executive Summary
Main Report
1. Introduction
1.1. Objectives of the Meta Evaluation
1.2. Approach and Methodology
2. Evaluation, Assessment and Findings
2.1. Assessment of the IPA Intervention Logic (EQ Group 2)
2.1.1. Analysis of Objectives and Indicators
2.1.2. Programming and Needs Assessment
2.1.3. Analysis of Financial Resources
2.1.4. Project Selection
2.1.5. Sequencing and Prioritisation
2.1.6. Alignment with the Beneficiaries’ Strategies
2.1.7. Coordination with Key Donors
2.1.8. Weaknesses of the Current IPA Programming Framework
2.2. Overview and Mapping of Existing Strategies in and Financial Assistance to the IPA Beneficiaries (EQ Groups 1 + 3)
2.2.1. The Existing Strategies in the IPA Beneficiaries
2.2.2. The Process of Implementing the Strategies by the IPA Beneficiaries
2.2.3. The Alignment of EU and Donor Assistance with the Strategies
2.2.4. The Orientation of IPA Programme Support via a Sector Based Approach
2.2.5. The Programming of External Assistance via a Sector Based Approach
2.3. Judgement on the Performance of the IPA 2007-2009(Component I) Programmes (EQ Group 5)
2.3.1. Capacity of the Administrative, Organisational and Monitoring Structures
2.3.2. Relevance, Efficiency and Effectiveness of the on-going Programmes
2.3.3. The Prospects for Impact and Sustainability of the on-going Programmes
3. Conclusions (Lessons Learned) and Recommendations
3.1. The Programming Framework – Improving its Strategic Focus(EQ Group 4)
3.2. On-going IPA (Component I) Assistance – Improving its Performance (EQ Group 6)
List of Annexes
Annex 1: Generalised Sequence of Annual Programming Activities
Annex 2: External Assistance to the IPA Beneficiaries, 2005-2009
Annex 3: List of the Contributory Evaluations Used in Completing the Meta Evaluation
Annex 4: List of Other Documents and Materials Used in Completing the Meta Evaluation
List of Tables
List of figures
Author (Corp. Body): HTSPE Limited
Contributer: Europäische Kommission
Year: 2011
ISBN / ISSN / Kat.Nr: Project No. 2010/231987 | FWC Commission 2007 – Lot No 4 | REQUEST FOR OFFER No 2010 / 231-987
Language: en
Ressource: Einzelne Berichte, Studien
Keyword: evaluationdevelopment aidEUjoining of the European Unionfinancial assistancebasic rightlawreform
Southeastern EuropeTurkeyadministrative procedurecivil society
Subject: Aid programmesEuropean Community funds and financial instruments. EIBEuropean Community external relationsPublic law. Public administration. Parliament
Countries Scheme: Europe. General ResourcesSoutheastern Europe, Balkan peninsula. General ResourcesTurkey
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Title: Study on the legal framework and administrative practices in the Member States of the European Communities regarding
reception conditions for persons seeking international protection : Final Report ; Part A: Comparative Analysis of
Reception Conditions for Persons seeking protection in the Member States of the European Union
Abstract
Report A presents the results of the comparative analysis of legal rules and practices governing reception conditions for asylum seekers in the 15 member states of the European Union. The comparative analysis has generally been carried out in three stages with the purpose of identifying patterns in the reception conditions offered by member states: 1. Synoptic tables comparing individual issues have been compiled on the basis of all the information gathered. 2. The information has been analysed with the primary purpose of describing differences and similarities among member states. 3. Relevant summary tables and information are presented and discussed in the report. [Author vide copyright]
Table of Contents
1. Introduction
1.1 Background of the study
1.1.1 ...
1.2 Contents of reports
1.2.1 ...
1.3 Sources of information
1.4 Executive summary of report A
2. Statistical trends
2.1 Trends in numbers of asylum seekers
2.2 Trends in statuses granted
2.3 Costs incurred in the pre-asylum phase
3. Trends regarding the political atmosphere surrounding foreigners
3.1 Atmosphere surrounding asylum seekers, refugees and immigrants
3.2 Attitudes towards common EU legislation on asylum
4. Patterns in the development of the legal framework and organization of the asylum procedure
4.1 Overall conditions for understanding differences in the pre-asylum phase
4.2 Development in the main legal frameworks governing the pre-asylum phase
4.3 Changes in the asylum procedures
4.3.1 ...
4.4 Statuses
4.5 Deportation or expulsion
4.6 Concluding remarks
5. Reception conditions for persons seeking protection
5.1 Social rights of asylum seekers compared to rights of ordinary citizens
5.2 Accommodation
5.2.1 ...
5.3 Access to education
5.3.1 ...
5.4 Access to health care
5.4.1 ...
5.5 Means of subsistence
5.5.1 ...
5.6 Access to the labour market
5.6.1 ...
6. Rules on detention and restrictions in free movement
6.1 The main use of detention
6.2 Access to appeal
6.3 Decisive authority
6.4 Length of detention
6.5 Other restrictions on free movement
7. Special conditions for certain groups
7.1 Conditions depending on the stage or expected outcome of procedure
7.1.1 ...
7.2 Differences in treatment between people seeking asylum and those seeking temporary protection
7.2.1 ...
7.3 Special conditions for vulnerable groups
7.3.1 ...
8. Extension of legal rights
8.1 Universal rights
8.2 Near-universal rights
8.3 Seldom-granted rights
Author (Corp. Body): PLS RAMBOLL Management
Contributer: Europäische Kommission / Generaldirektion Justiz und Inneres
Year: 2000
Language: en
Ressource: Einzelne Berichte, Studien
Keyword: right of asylumasylum procedureEUadministrative procedure
Subject: European Community law in generalHuman rights
Countries Scheme: Europe. General Resources
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Title: Challenges and practices for establishing the identity of third-country nationals in migration procedures : EMN
Synthesis Report for the EMN Focussed Study 2017
Abstract
The following synthesis report presents an overview of the important challenges faced by national authorities in EU Member States and Norway in their efforts to establish and verify the identity of third-country nationals within the context of various migration procedures and of national practices to address those challenges. Moreover, the study provides an insight into the use of information management systems at national and European level to support identification and verification processes. This study updates and supplements the 2013 EMN Study “Establishing Identity for International Protection: Challenges and Practices”.[Author vide copyright]
Table of Contents
Executive summary
Introduction
Rationale and context of the Study
Study aims
Scope of the study
EU legal and policy context
Structure of the report
1 The National Framework
1.1 Challenges in relation to identity management in the migration process
1.2 Relevant national legislation
1.3 Institutional Framework
2 Methods for Establishing Identity
2.1 Definition and Documents required for establishing identity
2.2 Methods used in the absence of documentary evidence of identity
3 Decision-making process
3.1 Status and weight of different methods and documents to determine identity4 Data sharing and data collection
4.1 Data-sharing mechanisms
4.2 Types of data collected
4.3 Recent changes in data processing
4.4 Recent and planned pilot Projects
5 Debate and evaluation
6 Conclusions
Annex 1 Overview of national authorities/institutions involved in identity establishment
Annex 2 Identity establishment procedures
Annex 3 Documents accepted by (Member) States
Annex 4 Statistical information on international protection and return procedures (2012-2016)
Annex 5 Statistical information on other migration-related procedures (2012-2016)
Annex 6: Statistical information on methods used to establish identity (2012-2016)
Author (Corp. Body): European Migration Network
Contributer: Europäische Kommission / Generaldirektion Migration und Inneres
Year: 2017
Language: en
Ressource: Einzelne Berichte, Studien
Keyword: data processingthird countriesEUidentityinformation systemmigration policylegal usageremigration
administrative procedure
Subject: European Community law in generalAdministrative proceduresMigrationVarious information networks and systems
Countries Scheme: Europe. General Resources
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Title: Changes in immigration status and purpose of stay: an overview of EU Member States’ approaches : Synthesis Report for
the EMN Focussed Study 2015
Abstract
The Study examined the different legal frameworks, procedures and practices in place in the Member States to enable third-country nationals to change migration status, as well as the conditions associated with such changes. It also looked at existing obstacles and good practices.[Author vide copyright]
Table of Contents
Executive summary
Key points to note
1 Introduction
1.1 Study rationale and aims
1.2 Information on the scale
1.3 Structure of the report
2 EU legal framework and national migration systems in relation to status changes
2.1 The EU legal framework
2.2 General overview of national migration systems in relation to status changes
2.2.1 National migration systems
2.2.2 National debates on change of status
2.3 Main drivers/ reasons behind changes of status promoted by legislators
3 Legal possibilities for change of status while remaining in the Member States
3.1 Legal possibilities to change status from within the Member State
3.1.1 Family
3.1.2 Education
3.1.3 Remunerated activities
3.1.4 Protection purposes
3.1.5 Other
3.2 Alteration of rights
3.3 Stakeholders involved
3.4 Information on the possibilities to change status
4 Admission criteria and legal basis
4.1 Legal basis
4.2 Main admission criteria
4.3 Statuses where the admission criteria differ from the first time application
4.3.1 Changes from student or researcher
4.3.2 Changes from family
4.3.3 Changes from employment-related statuses
4.3.4 Changes from long-stay (D-type) visa
4.3.5 Changes from asylum seeker
4.3.6 Changes from other statuses
4.4 Quota limitations
4.5 Procedural facilitations
5 Effectiveness, impact and perception of national policies regarding changes of status
5.1 Effectiveness and impact of national policies
5.2 Perception of the change of status atnational level
5.3 Change of status and prevention of irregularity
6 Challenges, good practices and lessons learned in change of status
6.1 Challenges for national authorities and applicants
6.2 Good practices and lessons learned
| 7 Conclusions
Annex 1 Minimum standards of rights for EU and nationally regulated statuses
Table A1.1 Minimum standards of rights for EU-regulated statuses
Table A1.2 Minimum standards of rights for national statuses regulated by EU law
Annex 2 Legal possibilities to change the status
Table A2.1 List of legal possibilities to change the status without leaving the country
Table A2.2 Share of legal possibilities for changing status in Member States out of total number of countries with each migration status
Annex 3 Common admission criteria
Table A3.1 Overview of common admission criteria
Annex 4 Statistics
Table A4.1 All valid residence permits by reason on 31 December and a share of those issued per reason out of total in Member State (2010-2014)
Table A4.2 Number and share of applicants for international protection (2010-2015)
Table A4.3 Number and share of EU Blue Cards granted (2012-2014)
Table A4.4 Issued skilled or highly skilled national labour permits (2010-2015)
Table A4.5 Total number of victims of trafficking (identified and presumed) by assistance and protection: residence permit based on Directive 2004/81 as well as other granted residence permits (2010-2012)
Table A4.6 Number of changes of immigration status permits by reason (2010-2014)
Table A4.7 Number of persons who have changed immigration status more than one time in France (2010-2014
Table A4.8 The average processing time to change the status (the time span between the application for change of status and the granting of the change of status), by purpose of stay in 2014
Author (Corp. Body): European Migration Network
Contributer: Europäische Kommission / Generaldirektion Migration und Inneres
Year: 2016
Language: en
Ressource: Einzelne Berichte, Studien
Keyword: best practicethird countriesimmigrationEUmigrationlawlegal usageadministrative procedure
Subject: European Community law in generalMigration
Countries Scheme: Europe. General Resources
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Title: Resettlement and Humanitarian Admission Programmes in Europe – what works?
Abstract
This Study provides an overview of the permanent and ad-hoc programmes and schemes for resettlement and humanitarian admission in EU Member States and Norway.[Author vide copyright]
Table of Contents
Executive summary
1 Introduction
1.1 Aims and rationale for the study
1.2 Study scope
1.3 Structure of the report
1.4 Background and context
1.5 Relevant statistics on resettlement and humanitarian admission
Funding and expenses
2 Resettlement and humanitarian admission in EU Member States
National debates
2.1 National programmes and schemes for resettlement and humanitarian admission
Objectives of resettlement/ humanitarian admission schemes
Quotas or pledges for resettlement and humanitarian admission programmes or schemes
2.2 Member states without resettlement or humanitarian admission programmes
Current situation and implementation challenges
National debate
2.3 Resettlement and humanitarian admission in detail: Pre-departure and departure
Identification and initial screening and selection
Criteria for selection and prioritisation
The selection process in practice
Notifying candidates after the decision to resettle and operational support
Information and cultural orientation prior to departure
Departure and transfer to the member state
2.4 Resettlement and humanitarian admission in detail: Post-arrival & integration
Status granted to resettled and admitted refugees
Immediate support upon arrival and short-term support
Geographical distribution and accommodation in the Member State
Freedom of movement within the Member State and outside
Information and cultural orientation upon arrival
Integration measures (long-term support)
Preparing the receiving community at local level
Access and rights to family reunification and naturalisation
3 Private sponsorship programmes and schemes
3.1 Overview of member state policies in private sponsorship
3.2 Eligibility criteria, status granted and sponsor obligations
4 Evaluations and identified challenges, good practices and lessons learnt
4.1 Challenges –Pre-departure and departure
4.2 Challenges –Post-arrival and integration
| 4.3 Good practices and lessons learnt
5 Conclusions
Annex 1 Glossary of terms
Annex 2 Additional information
Author (Corp. Body): European Migration Network
Contributer: Europäische Kommission / Generaldirektion Migration und Inneres
Year: 2016
Language: en
Ressource: Einzelne Berichte, Studien
Keyword: EUrefugeehumanitarian aidintegrationmigrationresettlementadministrative procedure
Subject: European Community external relationsSocial policy. Social welfareHuman rights
Countries Scheme: Europe. General Resources
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Title: Migrant access to social security and healthcare : policies and practice
Title (other): European Migration Network Study 2014
Abstract
The overall objective of the study is to map the policies and administrative practices that shape third-country nationals’ access to social security, including healthcare. There is substantial variation in how third-country nationals experience the social security system in EU Member States, as complex administrative rules and practices related to nationality, periods of employment, contributions, residency or transferability shape the pattern of take up of social security, including healthcare among migrant groups.[Author vide copyright]
Table of Contents
Executive summary
1 INTRODUCTION
1.1 Rationale
1.2 Study aims
1.3 Policy and political context
1.4 Scope
1.4.1 Categories of third-country nationals
1.4.2 Branches of social security
1.5 Structure of the report
2 OVERVIEW OF NATIONAL SOCIAL SECURITY SYSTEMS AND HOW THEY APPLY TO MIGRANTS FROM THIRD COUNTRIES
2.1 EU Competences in the field of social security
2.2 Range of benefits and programmes that exist in Member States, their financing mechanisms and their accessibility by third-country nationals
2.2.1 Healthcare
2.2.2Sickness cash benefits
2.2.3 Maternity and paternity benefits
2.2.4 Invalidity benefits
2.2.5 Old-age pensions and benefits
2.2.6 Survivors’ benefits
2.2.7 Benefits in respect of accidents at work and occupational diseases
2.2.8 Family benefits
2.2.9 Unemployment benefits
2.2.10 Guaranteed minimum resources
2.2.11 Long-term care
2.3Connections made between social security policies and immigration policies in the Member States
2.4 Recent or planned changes to the eligibility rules for social security benefits and programmes that may have an impact on access by third-country nationals
3 NATIONAL RULES ON ACCESS TO SOCIAL SECURITY FOR THIRD-COUNTRY NATIONALS
3.1 Minimum residence period
3.1.1 Healthcare
3.1.2 Sickness cash benefits
3.1.3 Maternity and paternity benefits
3.1.4 Old-age pensions and benefits
3.1.5 Family benefits
3.1.6 Unemployment benefits
3.1.7 Guaranteed minimum resources
3.2 Exportability of benefits
3.2.1 Healthcare
3.2.2 Sickness cash benefits
3.2.3 Maternity and paternity benefits
3.2.4 Old-age pensions and benefits
3.2.5 Family benefits
3.2.6 Unemployment benefits
3.2.7 Guaranteed minimum resources
3.3 Minimum employment (contribution) period
3.3.1 Healthcare
3.3.2 Sickness cash benefits
3.3.3 Maternity and paternity benefits
3.3.4 Old-age pensions and benefits
3.3.5 Family benefits
3.3.6 Unemployment benefits
| 3.3.7 Guaranteed minimum resources
3.4 Migration specific conditions for accessing the benefits
3.4.1 Healthcare
3.4.2 Sickness cash benefits
3.4.3 Maternity and paternity benefits
3.4.4 Old-age pensions and benefits
3.4.5 Family benefits
3.4.6 Unemployment benefits
3.4.7 Guranteed minimum resources
4 ADMINISTRATIVE PRACTICES THAT AFFECT THIRD-COUNTRY NATIONALS’ ACCESS TO SOCIAL SECURITY
4.1 Discretionary conditions in the determination of eligibility
4.1.1 Discretion in assessing the residence status of the applicant
4.1.2Discretion in waiving eligibility conditions for social security benefits
4.1.3 Discretion applied during a means test for granting non-contributory benefits
4.1.4 Discretion applied when assessing whether to grant emergency support for persons who have entered the Member State with the intent of obtaining social benefits
4.2 Methodological guidance for deciding officers in charge of implementing discretionary criteria
4.3 Effect of applications for social security on the legal status of third-country nationals
4.3.1 Effects on residence permit renewal
4.3.2 Effects on application for naturalisation
4.3.3 Effects on family reunification
4.4 Translation, interpretation and other forms of supportto third-country nationals in accessing social security
4.4.1 Translation
4.4.2 Interpretation
4.4.3 Provision of information
4.4.4 Additional support provided
5 EXTERNAL DIMENSION OF SOCIAL SECURITY
5.1 Member State bilateral agreements on the co-ordination of social security with third countries
5.2 Key provisions in the bilateral social security agreements
5.2.1 Possibility for workers from a third-country to work in the (Member) Statewhile remaining subject to the social security legislation of the sending state
5.2.2 Equal treatment in the system of the host state in respect of particular benefits
5.2.3 Provisions in bilateral agreements on the exportability of benefits
| 5.2.4 Other provisions in bilateral agreements
5.3 Extent to which third-country nationals have invoked their rights under the bilateral social security agreements reached between the (Member) State and third countries
6 CASE STUDIES
6.1 Case study 1
6.2 Case study 2
6.3 Case study 3
7 CONCLUDING REMARKS
ANNEX 1 EU Competences in the field of social security
ANNEX 2 National institutional framework
ANNEX 3 Glossary
ANNEX 4 Discretionary conditions applied in member states
Author (Corp. Body): European Migration Network
Contributer: Europäische Kommission / Generaldirektion Inneres
Year: 2014
Language: en
Ressource: Einzelne Berichte, Studien
Keyword: alienthird countriesEUhealth caremigrantsocial securityadministrative proceduremigrant worker
Subject: Social securitySocial services and medico-social assistanceAdministrative proceduresLabour market
Countries Scheme: Europe. General Resources
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Title: Establishing Identity for International Protection : Challenges and Practices
Abstract
This Synthesis Report presents the main findings of the second EMN Focussed Study “Establishing Identity for International Protection: Challenges and Practices”. The aim of the study is to provide an overview of important challenges facing national authorities in their efforts to establish, in the absence of credible documentation, the identity of applicants for international protection (i.e. asylum and subsidiary protection) and for the return of rejected applicants. It also aims to draw together an overview of national practices in handling these challenges, while allowing for the identification of possible steps towards further (joint) actions.[Author vide copyright]
Table of Contents
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
1. INTRODUCTION
2. RELEVANT NATIONAL AND EU LEGISLATION
2.1 International Protection
2.1.1. Obligation of applicants to cooperate with the authorities
2.1.2. Right of the competent authorities to search the applicant
2.1.3. Possibility to prioritise/accelerate the asylum procedure in cases where the applicant has misled authorities
2.1.4 Investigating and establishing identity
2.1.5 Legislation outlining methods for establishing identity
2.1.6. Fixed terms for the establishment of identity
2.2 Return Procedure
2.2.1. Contacts with presumed countries of origin
2.2.2. Legislation outlining methods for establishing identity
3. INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK FOR ESTABLISHING IDENTITY3.1 Types of organisations involved
3.2 Establishing the identity of asylum applicants as part of the decision making process
3.3 Establishing the identity of rejected asylum applicants for return: organisations involved
3.4 Central Competence Centres
4. METHODS FOR ESTABLISHING IDENTITY
4.1 Defining identity
4.2 Documents required for confirming identity
4.3 Methods used to establish identity in the absence of credible information
4.3.1 Methods for establishing identity in international protection procedures
4.3.2 Methods used in the (forced) return of rejected applicants
5. DECISION-MAKING PROCESS
5.1 Attribution and Determination of Identity
5.2 Weight of different methods to determine identity and grading systems
5.3 Influence of identity establishment on outcome of cases
5.3.1 International Protection
5.3.2 (Forced) Return
6. CONCLUSIONS
ANNEX
Author (Corp. Body): European Migration Network
Contributer: Europäische Kommission
Year: 2013
Language: en
Ressource: Einzelne Berichte, Studien
Keyword: person seeking asylumthird countriesEUidentitymigration policylawlegal usageremigration
administrative procedure
Subject: European Community law in generalAdministrative proceduresMigration
Countries Scheme: Europe. General Resources
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Title: Intra-EU Mobility of third-country nationals
Title (other): European Migration Network Study 2013
Abstract
The purpose of this EMN Focussed Study 2012 was to act as a scoping exercise to better understand the key issues and challenges in relation to the intra-EU mobility of third-country nationals in the different Member States....The study aimed, firstly, to provide an overview of current mobility provisions within the EU acquis to encourage the intra-EU mobility of third-country nationals and to explore also the national rules in place that regulate such movements. Secondly, it aimed to identify the key issues on intra-EU mobility for third-country nationals as perceived by the different Member States, in particular the challenges/barriers which may be affecting such mobility for reasons of work. Finally, the study aimed to ‘map’ the extent to which statistics are available on the scale and scope of intra-EU mobility of third-country nationals in order to characterise, to the extent possible, the current trends and patterns of mobility, for example, who is moving where and from which Member States, their reasons for mobility, their nationality and skills levels. The focus of the study is on periods of stay in the second Member State exceeding three months. Irregular movements of third-country nationals between Member States were not included in the study.[Author vide copyright]
Table of Contents
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
1. INTRODUCTION
1.1 Aims and objectives of the study
2. SOME INSIGHTS INTO THE SCALE AND SCOPE OF INTRA-EU MOBILITY OF THIRD-COUNTRY NATIONALS
2.1 Overall scope, pattern and trends
2.1.1 Member State of previous residence
2.1.2 Skills profile
2.1.3 Age
2.1.4 Sex
2.1.5 Nationality
2.1.6 Employment situation, occupation and industry
2.1.7 Family status
2.2 Groups of third-country nationals who are provided for by the EU acquis
2.3 Groups of third-country nationals who are not provided for by the EU acquis
3. THE EU ACQUIS IN RELATION TO INTRA-EU MOBILITY
3.1 EU instruments governing intra-EU mobility for EU citizens and their family members
3.2 EU instruments governing intra-EU mobility for third-country nationals
3.3 Intra EU mobility for categories of third-country nationals not provided for in the EU legal migration acquis
3.4 Other provisions within the EU acquis that may impact on intra-EU mobility of third-country nationals
4. THE NATIONAL LEGISLATIVE FRAMEWORK: VISAS AND RESIDENCE PERMITS
4.1 Mobility rights for third-country nationals under the EU’s Migration Directives4.1.2 Highly Qualified Workers: EU Blue Card holders
4.1.3 Researchers
4.1.4 Students
4.1.5 Posted workers
4.2 Third-country nationals who are not provided for by the EU acquis
4.2.1 Cross-border workers
4.2.2 Seasonal workers
4.2.3 Workers in regulated professions
4.2.4 Other categories of migrant workers
5. LIMITATIONS TO INTRA-EU MOBILITY FOR THIRD-COUN TR Y NATIONALS
5.1 Access to the labour market
5.1.1 Labour market testing
5.1.2 Annual entry quotas
5.1.3 Labour market access only granted for a particular employer or professions
5.1.4 Categories of workers exempt from Labour market testing
5.2 Minimum wages
5.3 Conditions for self-employment
5.4 Recognition of degrees, diplomas and qualifications
| 5.5 Access to social security and social services
5.6 Other restrictions
6. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS
ANNEX 1: EU INSTRUMENTS GOVERNING INTRA-EU MOBILITY, INCLUDING PROPOSALS
ANNEX 2: RESULTS OF MAPPING OF AVAILABLE STATISTICS ON NTRA-EU MOBILITY OF THIRD-COUNTRY NATIONALS: PATTERNS AND TRENDS
ANNEX 3: OTHER/PROXY SOURCES OF STATISTICS THAT COULD PROVIDE INDICATIONS OF PATTERNS AND TRENDS
ANNEX 4: STATISTICS AVAILABLE ON THE FLOWS OF EU NATIONALS IN THE LAST 5 YEARS IN ORDER TO PROVIDE A COMPARISON WITH THE FLOWS OF THIRD-COUNTRY NATIONALS
Author (Corp. Body): European Migration Network
Publisher: Europäische Kommission / Generaldirektion Inneres
Year: 2013
Language: en
Ressource: Einzelne Berichte, Studien
Keyword: labor migrationthird countriesimmigrationEUfreedom of movementmigrantmobilitylaw
administrative procedure
Subject: European Community law in generalDemocracy and civil liberties
Countries Scheme: Europe. General Resources
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Title: Attracting Highly Qualified and Qualified Third-Country Nationals
Title (other): European Migration Network Study 2013
Abstract
The aim of this focussed study was to outline policies and concrete practical measures in Member States that aim to attract (highly) qualified third-country nationals. More specifically, the study aimed to achieve the following objectives:Provide an overview of national policies and EU acquis aimed at attracting (highly) qualified third-country nationals for the purpose of work;Outline concrete practical measures which are implemented to achieve the goals of the national policies;Investigate available evaluative evidence and inform practitioners, policy officers, decision makers and others about the effectiveness (or non-effectiveness) of different practical measures for attracting (highly) qualified third-country nationals where possible;Map labour migration agreements specifically targeting (highly) qualified third-country nationals and analysing their effectiveness, also in the framework of Mobility Partnerships, if relevant;Identify challenges or barriers that affect the attractiveness of an EU Member State for (highly) qualified third-country nationals’ immigration;Draw conclusions on good practices and lessons learnt with regard to attracting (highly) qualified third-country nationals.[Author vide copyright]
Table of Contents
ExecutiveSummary
1. Introduction
2. Background
2.1 EU Policy and Acquis
2.2 Current Trends in the representationof (highly) qualified third-country nationals in EU Employment
3. National Policies including concepts and measures
3.1 Definitions and Concepts
3.2 National Policies
3.3 Approaches and Measures
3.4 Public Debate
3.5 Agreements with third countries
3.6 Brain drain and brain circulation
4. Effectiveness of Policies and Measures
4.1 Emerging Good Practice
4.2 Challenges and Barriers
5. Impact of EU Acquis
5.1 EU Blue Card Directive
5.2 Researcher’s Directive
6. Conclusions
Annex 1 International Classifications of Education and Occupations
Annex 2 Presence of Policies and Strategies for attracting (highly) qualified third-country nationals
Annex 3 National Concepts
Author (Corp. Body): European Migration Network
Contributer: Europäische Kommission / Generaldirektion Inneres
Year: 2013
Language: en
Ressource: Einzelne Berichte, Studien
Keyword: labor migrationbest practicethird countriesEUmigration policymobilitylegal basisadministrative procedure
Subject: European Community treaties and agreementsPersonnel management
Countries Scheme: Europe. General Resources
Online Ressource: vorübergehend nicht erreichbar!
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Title: Practical Measures to Reduce Irregular Migration
Title (other): Practical Measures to Reduce Irregular Migration : Annexes
Abstract
The overall purpose of this EMN Study on Practical Measures to Reduce Irregular Migration is to provide an overview of existing approaches, mechanisms and measures to reduce irregular migration in the EU and Norway. In particular, its aim is to inform policymakers and practitioners about the practical measures that have proved effective and proportionate in addressing the issue of irregular migration, both in relation to prevention and in providing pathways out of irregularity, including best practice and to contextualise national policies and practices within the overall EU policy framework. A further aim was to present the available statistics and the methods of data collection used by Member States to estimate the irregular migrant population.[Author vide copyright]
Table of Contents
7.2.2 Costs of return / removal
7.2.3 Situations in which removal is difficult and practical responses to this
8. EU AND EUROPEAN COOPERATION
8.1 The impact of Schengen
8.2 The impact of the EU Solidarity Funds (RF and EBF)
8.2.1 European Return Fund (RF)
8.2.2 External Border Fund
8.3 Cooperation with EU Agencies or international organisations
8.4 Cooperation between Member State
8.5 Legislative cooperation with third countries (including EU Readmission Agreements)
8.5.1 EU Readmission Agreements
8.5.2 Bilateral readmission agreements
9. CONCLUDING REMARKS
9.1 Statistical Analysis
9.2 The effectiveness of practical measures
9.3 The impact of EU legislation
9.4 Barriers to effectiveness
9.5 Lessons learnt
9.6 Additional measures identified
| EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
1. INTRODUCTION
1.1 Definitions and Terminology used in the Study
1.2 Methodology
2. EU POLICY ON REDUCING IRREGULAR MIGRATION
3. NATIONAL POLICIES ON AND LEGAL FRAMEWORKS FOR REDUCING IRREGULAR MIGRATION
3.1 Institutional Framework
3.2 National Legislative Frameworks
3.3 Recent legislative changes and their drivers
4. PRE-ENTRY MEASURES
4.1 Information and awareness-raising campaigns
4.2 Pre-entry controls and checks prior to arrival at the national border
4.3 Role of carriers
4.4 Immigration Liaison Officers (ILOs)
4.5 Identification of irregular migration routes
4.6 (Other) Intelligence-gathering and Risk Assessment
4.7 Training and other Support Activities
4.8 Co-operation with third countries
5. ENTRY MEASURES
5.1 Refusals of entry at the borders: a statistical overview
5.2 Use of technology for border surveillance
5.3 Measures to improve border-management and checking of passengers
5.4 Measures to detect and prevent use of false documents for entry
5.5 Cross-border cooperation
5.6 Cooperation with Frontex
6. MEASURES TAKEN DURING STAY IN THE (MEMBER) STATE
6.1 Estimates of stock of irregular migrants
6.2 Identification of irregular migrants on the territory
6.2.1 Apprehensions of third-country nationals found to be irregularly present
6.3 Measures to prevent employment of irregular migrants
6.3.1 Workplace inspections
6.3.2 Sanctioning of employers
6.3.3 Other practical measure to reduce employment of irregular migrants
6.4 Detection and prevention of fraudulent means of staying on the Member State territory
6.5 Other practical measures undertaken
7. PATHWAYS OUT OF IRREGULARITY
7.1 Obtaining legal status (regularisation)
7.2 Return
7.2.1 The impact of the Return Directive : (Directive 2008/115/EC)
| ANNEX I – DEFINITIONS RELATED TO IRREGULAR MIGRATION
ANNEX II – RECENT AND ONGOING STUDIES ON IRREGULAR MIGRATION
ANNEX III - EU ACTIONS TO REDUCE IRREGULAR MIGRATION AND LIST OF RELEVANT EU LEGISLATION
ANNEX IV – OVERVIEW OF NATIONAL LEGISLATION
ANNEX V – PENALTIES IMPOSED IN MEMBER STATES IN RELATION TO IRREGULAR MIGRATION
ANNEX VI – EXAMPLES OF PROJECTS FUNDED BY THE EUROPEAN RETURN FUND AND THE EXTERNAL BORDERS FUND IN (MEMBER) STATES (AS PROVIDED IN NATIONAL REPORTS)
ANNEX VII – ADDITIONAL STATISTICS ON IRREGULAR MIGRATION
ANNEX VIII – BIBLIOGRAPHY
Author (Corp. Body): European Migration Network
Contributer: Europäische Kommission
Year: 2012
Language: en
Ressource: Einzelne Berichte, Studien
Keyword: third countriesEUcooperationmigration policyremigrationstatisticsadministrative procedureimmigration
Subject: European Community treaties and agreementsAdministrative proceduresMigration
Countries Scheme: Europe. General Resources
Online Ressource: vorübergehend nicht erreichbar!
Bitte beachten Sie die urheberrechtlichen Bedingungen der Dokumentenbenutzung / Please observe the copyright when accessing the document | Quelle / Source: Europäische Kommission (http://ec.europa.eu/)
Title: Evaluation of the Implementation of the Dublin III Regulation : Final report
Table of Contents
8 Other (Administrative cooperation)
8.1 Information sharing
8.2 Administrative arrangements
8.3 Conciliation procedure
8.4 Early Warning, Preparedness and Crisis Management system
| 1 Introduction
1.1 Study’s objectives
1.2 Scope
1.3 Structure of the report
1.4 Outline of the methodology
1.5 Challenges encountered
2 Organisational structure and resources of the competent authorities dealing with Dublin
2.1 Organisational structure of the competent authorities
2.2 Resources of the competent authorities
2.3 Training of the competent authorities
2.4 Communication between the competent authorities: the exchange of information via DubliNet
3 Procedural guarantees and safeguards for applicants for international protection
3.1 Right to information
3.2 Personal interview
3.3 Guarantees for minors
4 Criteria/procedures for determining the Member State responsible
4.1 Access to the procedure (Article 3)
4.2 Hierarchy of criteria (Articles 7–16)
4.3Family unity including minors (Articles 7(3), 8-11)
4.4 Dependency (Article 16)
4.5 Discretionary clause (Article 17(1))
4.6 Humanitarian clause (Article 17(2))
5 Procedures for submitting take charge/take back requests375.1Statistical overview
5.2 Procedure to submit a take charge request (Article 21)
5.3 Procedure to reply to a take charge request (Article 22)
5.4 Procedure to submit a take back request when a new application has been lodged (Article 23)
5.5 Procedure to reply to a take back request (Article 25)
5.6 Grounds for refusals to accept take charge and take back requests
5.7 Take back requests and the Return Directive (Article 24(2) and (4))
5.8 Take back rules (Articles 18 and 20(5))
5.9 Cessation of responsibility (Article 19 and 20(5))
6 Implementation of transfers
6.1 Notification of a transfer decision (Article 26)
6.2 Procedure to transfer applicants: time and modalities (Article 29)
6.3 Exchange of information before a transfer is carried out
6.4 Exchange of health data before a transfer is carried out
6.5 Detention (Article 28)
7 Appeal
7.1 Remedies (Article 27
Author (Corp. Body): ICF International
Contributer: Europäische Kommission / Generaldirektion Migration und Inneres
Year: 2016
Language: en
Ressource: Einzelne Berichte, Studien
Keyword: right of asylumasylum procedurethird countriesEUlegal usageadministrative procedure
Subject: European Community lawHuman rights
Countries Scheme: Europe. General Resources
Online Ressource: vorübergehend nicht erreichbar!
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Title: Evaluation of the Dublin III Regulation : Final report
Abstract
In line with the Terms of Reference, the aims of the Dublin III Evaluation are threefold:To study and provide an in-depth analysis (article-by-article) on the practical implementation of the ‘Dublin III Regulation’in all Member States (phase 1);To evaluate the effectiveness, efficiency, relevance, consistency and EU added value of the Dublin III Regulation (phase 2);and,To identify potential elements inwhich the Dublin III Regulation could be amended (phase 3).This report feeds into phase 2 of the Study and constitutes the ‘Final Evaluation Report’. It provides an overview of the answers to the evaluation questions included in the Terms of Reference of the Study based on the evidence collected from 19 Member States. The report should be read in conjunction with the Final Implementation Report.[Author vide copyright]
Table of Contents
1 Introduction
1.1 Aim of the study and purpose of the report
1.2 Methodology.
1.3 Structure of the report
2 Relevance of Dublin III Regulation
2.1 The relevance of establishing a method for determining the Member State responsible for examining an application for international protection
2.2 The relevance of a legal framework codifying the method for determining the responsible Member State
2.3 Relevance of Dublin III’s building blocks to achieving its general and specific objectives
3 The effectiveness of the Dublin III Regulation
3.1 Objective 1: To establish a clear and workable method
3.2 Objective 2: To guarantee swift access to the asylum procedure (and prevent the phenomenon of asylum seekers in orbit)
3.3 Objective 3: To prevent applicants for international protection from pursuing multiple applications in different Member States (thereby reducing secondary movements of asylum seekers)
3.4 Objective 4: To ensure an equitable distribution of applicants for and beneficiaries of international protection between Member States
4 The efficiency of the Dublin III Regulation
4.1 The direct and indirect costs of implementing the Dublin III procedure
4.2 Are the costs justified?
5 Coherence and complementarity
5.1Conformity of the Dublin III Regulation with fundamental rights
5.2 Conformity of the Dublin III Regulation with other treaty rules
5.3 Coherence and complementarity with the EU acquis
6 EU added value
Annex 1 Tables and figures
Annex 2 Methodological note on the efficiency of the Dublin III Regulation
Author (Corp. Body): ICF International
Contributer: Europäische Kommission / Generaldirektion Migration und Inneres
Year: 2015
Language: en
Ressource: Einzelne Berichte, Studien
Keyword: right of asylumasylum procedurethird countriesEUlegal usageadministrative procedure
Subject: European Community lawHuman rights
Countries Scheme: Europe. General Resources
Online Ressource: vorübergehend nicht erreichbar!
Bitte beachten Sie die urheberrechtlichen Bedingungen der Dokumentenbenutzung / Please observe the copyright when accessing the document | Quelle / Source: Europäische Kommission (http://ec.europa.eu/)
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